Community Trends For Consideration

The community trends listed here may or may not impact your particular community. It is however a good list to begin deeper discussion and research about whether or not there is a readiness to respond to emerging trends.

 

 

    • Amalgamation of local governments and institutions

 

    • Aging population

 

    • Biomimicry (innovation inspired by nature)

 

    • Built Environments - understanding the impact of our environment on health

 

    • Changing volunteer profiles (more seniors with more time and a need for meaning in their lives, fewer youth involved)

 

    • Citizens have less affinity to their geographic community

 

    • Continued urbanization

 

    • Creative Communities (places that attract a class of workers whose function requires thinking or creating and thus can choose where they live)

 

    • Data Overload

 

    • Development of Brownfields (abandoned, idled, or under-used industrial and commercial facilities)

 

    • Devolution of services to lower levels of government and the voluntary sector

 

    • Diminished influence of senior governments

 

    • Ecological Footprints/Green Building

 

    • EduTourism/EcoTourism

 

    • Experiential hedonism (search for happiness through experience)

 

    • Free time available in smaller segments

 

    • Genuine Progress Index/Green Accounting (replacing Gross Domestic Product as better ways of measuring what matters in communities)

 

    • Greater divide between 'haves' and 'have nots'

 

    • Greater flexibility of gender, roles and equity of sexes

 

    • Increased interest in environmental stewardship

 

    • Increased substance abuse (drugs) for diversion or to reduce stress

 

    • Increasing ethnic diversity

 

    • Influence of technology contributing to a 'global village'

 

    • Easier to act on intrinsic need to be involved in a community of interest

 

    • Jobs are not a fixed list of tasks but instead a list of targeted outcomes

 

    • Learning Communities/Lifelong Learning becoming more important

 

    • Less trust in government and large institutions

 

    • Longer period for retirement

 

    • More flexible work time and place

 

    • More people with special needs

 

    • More desire to be involved in decision-making

 

    • Nature Deficit Disorder

 

    • People feel stressed/rushed

 

    • Pressure to seek alternative work models

 

    • Processing speeds and power will continue to increase dramatically so that multi-media interfaces will become easier

 

    • Public focus on achieving results vs. delivery of services

 

    • Reduction in public sector spending

 

    • 'Sandwich' generation (those squeezed between caring for elderly parents as well as their own children)

 

    • Sedentary youth lifestyles impacting health

 

    • Smaller households

 

    • Smart Growth/Infilling in communities

 

    • More interest in spiritual quests

 

    • Systems Thinking (recognition of the need for a 360 degree perspective i.e. of an organization or community)

 

    • Weakening concept of the stand alone 'professional'

 

    • Wireless communication technology will allow people to communicate from anywhere

 

    • Youth un/underemployment resulting in youth poverty

 


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